Computer Science
overview

Our modern world is r​un by computers — they make our work and our play easier, more productive, and more fun.  They've revolutionized how we function as a society and how we interact as people. Computer Science provides the framework for high-tech innovation and the underlying superstructure that supports our modern lifestyle.  ​

It's no wonder then that Computer Science is one of the most popular and lucrative career choices. If you like problem solving, math, and science, or just see the future differently and want to make your own contribution a Computer Science major may be an ideal way to get started.  ​

    • Computing jobs are invariably ranked among the highest paid, and have the highest job satisfaction. 
    • Whether you prefer to work in a team environment or on your own free to let your imagination explore its own boundaries, working with computers provides the opportunity for both.
    • Computing jobs are plentiful with unlimited career options and job paths. 
    • The average salary for the most in-demand positions for computer science majors is about $89,000. 
    • Employment opportunities for computer scientists are expected to increase some 19 per cent through the year 2020. ​​ 


COMSC-072 - Discrete Mathematics

This course is an introduction to the discrete and combinatorial mathematics that serves as a foundation for advanced c​ourses in mathematics and computer science. Topics include logic, predicates and quantifiers, validity of argument, mathematical proof techniques (including induction), sets, Boolean algebras, recursive algorithms, functions, relations, elementary number theory, combinatorics, discrete probability, and an introduction to graphs and trees.

Units: 4

Lecture Hours: 4 |  Lab Hours: None |  Repeatable: No |  Grading: L | Credit by Exam: Yes

Prerequisite: MATH 021 and 022 or MATH 025; all with C or better

Advisory Level  —   Read: 3   |  Write: 3  | Math:

Transfer Status: CSU/UC |  Degree Applicable: AA/AS


COMSC-075 - Computer Science I: Introduction to Program Structures

An introduction to computer programming concepts from a computer science perspective. Programming structures of sequential, selection and repetition are covered using a high-level object oriented language. Using existing classes and creating classes, methods, argument passing, program and data abstraction (including arrays) are covered. Documentation, programming style, and program design and development are addressed throughout the course.

Units: 4

Lecture Hours: 3 |  Lab Hours: 3 |  Repeatable: No |  Grading: L

Prerequisite: MATH 025 or MATH 021 and MATH 022, all with C or better.

Advisory Level  —   Read: 3   |  Write: 3  | Math:

Transfer Status: CSU/UC |  Degree Applicable: AA/AS


COMSC-076 - Computer Science II: Introduction to Data Structures

This course covers abstract data types and structures in an Object Oriented environment and the use of advanced programming techniques. Students will learn to reason mathematically about programs, including Big-O methods. The principles of encapsulation, abstraction, and polymorphism will be applied to large programming projects. The course will cover data structures and algorithms for such task as searching, sorting, and collections, using sets and list implement with arrays and link-list and to implement stacks, queues, trees, graphs, iterators and hashing.

Units: 4

Lecture Hours: 3 |  Lab Hours: 3 |  Repeatable: No |  Grading: L

Prerequisite: COMSC 072 or MATH 070 and COMSC 075, all with a C or better

Advisory Level  —   Read: 3   |  Write: 3  | Math:

Transfer Status: CSU/UC |  Degree Applicable: AA/AS


COMSC-138 - Work Experience

Occupational Work Experience is designed for students who work or volunteer in a field related to their career major. Students are required to provide evidence that they are enrolled in a career program (e.g., education plan or coursework in a career/occupational subject area). Students can earn one unit of credit for each 60 hours of unpaid volunteer time or 75 hours of paid work during the semester. Students can repeat Career/Occupational Work Experience, combined with General Work Experience, or alone, up to a maximum of 16 units. Internship/job placement is not guaranteed.

Units: 1 - 8

Lecture Hours: None |  Lab Hours: 1.81 |  Repeatable: 15 |  Grading: O

Corequisite: Be employed or a volunteer at an approved work-site for the minimum number of hours per unit as stipulated for paid and unpaid status.

Advisory Level  —   Read: 3   |  Write: 3  | Math:

Transfer Status: CSU |  Degree Applicable: AA/AS​

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