Bystander Intervention

​​​​​​BYSTANDER TIPS

​San Jose City College & Evergreen Valley College encourages all members of our community to be Active Bystanders against sexual violence. Please remember to ensure your own safety at all times.​

S​imple steps to becoming an active bystander

  1. ​Notice the Situation.
  2. Interpret it as a problem
  3. Feel empowered to act
  4. Know what to do
  5. Intervene safely

How to intervene

  1. Tell another person
  2. Ask a person you are worried about if they are okay
  3. Distract or redirect individuals in unsafe situations
  4. Ask the person if they want to leave
  5. Call campus police or 911​
What Can I Do to be Safe?
  1. Have a plan. 
  2. Watch out for others you know.
  3. Talk to your friends before going out.
  4. Go out with as a group and come home as a group.
  5. Never leave your friends behind in potentially risk situations.
  6. Walk together in groups or make sure others have safe rides.
  7. Diffuse situations that look dangerous/ risky.
  8. Be aware of your surroundings.
  9. Be aware of the amount of alcohol you are consuming and its effects. ​​

​RI​SK REDUCTION

Risk Reduction for Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, Sexual Harassment & Sexual Violence

 

While victim-blaming is never appropriate and the District fully recognizes that only those who commit sexual misconduct are responsible for their actions, the District provides the following suggestions that follow to help individuals reduce their risk of being victimized and their risk of committing acts of sexual misconduct.​

Reducing the risk of victimization

  1. Make any limits/ boundaries you may have known as early as possible.
  2. Clearly and firmly articulate consent or lack of consent.
  3. Remove yourself, if possible, from an aggressor's physical presence.
  4. Reach out for help, either from someone who is physically nearby or by calling someone.  People around you may be waiting for a signal that you need help.
  5. Take affirmative responsibility for your alcohol and/or drug consumption.  Alcohol and drugs can increase your vulnerability to sexual victimization.
  6. Look out for your friends, and ask them to look out for you.  Respect them, and ask them to respect you, but be willing to challenge each other about high-risk choices.​

Reducing the risk of being accused of Sexual misconduct

  1. Show your potential respect if you are in a position of initiating sexual behavior.
  2. If a potential partner says "no," accept it and don't push.  If you want a "yes," ask for it, and don't proceed without clear permission.
  3. Clearly communicate your intentions to your potential sexual partners, and give them the chance to share their intentions and/or boundaries with you.
  4. Respect personal boundaries. If you are unsure what's OK in any interaction, ask.
  5. Avoid ambiguity. Don't make assumptions about consent, about whether someone is attracted to you, how far you can go with that person, or if the individual is physically and mentally able to consent.  If you have questions or are unclear, you don't have consent.
  6. Don't take advantage of the fact that someone may be under the influence of drugs or alcohol, even if that person chose to become that way. Others' loss of control does not put you in control.
  7. Be on the lookout for mixed messages. That should be a clear indication to stop and talk about what your partner wants or doesn't want to happen. That person may be undecided about how far to go with you, or you may have missed a previous signal.
  8. Respect the timeline for sexual behaviors with which others are comfortable, and understand that they are entitled to change their minds.
  9. Recognize that even if you don't think you are intimidating in any way, your potential partner may be intimidated by or fearful of you, perhaps because of your sex, physical size, or a position of power or authority you may hold.
  10. Do not assume that someone's silence or passivity is an indication of consent. Pay attention to verbal and non-verbal signals to avoid misreading intentions.
  11. Understand that consent to one type of sexual behavior does not automatically grant consent to other types of sexual behaviors.  If you are unsure, stop and ask.
  12. Understand that exerting power and control over another through sex is unacceptable conduct.​

Relationship Rights

  1. Right to live free from violence & abuse
  2. Right to feel safe and respected
  3. Right to say NO​
  4. Right to privacy, online and offline
  5. Right to do things you enjoy
  6. Right to end a relationship​
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